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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 30, 2010 3:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

Identify:

"I'm a poet; I know it; hope I don't blow it."

I guess that since I disserted on William Carlos Williams, I should be more open. But, then, he felt anything was fair game to be IN a poem. Hunter is just a lyricist, a collaberator. Just because he collected it all into a book don't make him an auteur.

Poetry is such a hard thing to define. Dark Star certainly smells of it, as does Crazy Fingers. Certainly, there are many things in between.

And, of course, one may go with the notion that poetry was lyric; thus lyric is poetry. I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.


Now Pig's rap on Hard to Handle, 4-29-71--THAT'S poetry!
Suck on that, potato man.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Mar 30, 2010 3:42pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

Nah, actually, I tend to agree...he is defn a poet only under a "broad defn" approach...besides, I know you KNOW this area better than me.

Was just glad to see you here and thought I'd stir it up a bit.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Mar 31, 2010 9:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

" Identify:

"I'm a poet; I know it; hope I don't blow it."

if that was a trivia question the answer is I shall be free no 10 on Another side of Bob Dylan

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 31, 2010 9:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

What’s probably got you baffled more
Is what this thing here is for
It’s nothing
It’s something I learned over in England.



What was that thing?

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 10:03am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

Flakes


I'm gonna grow my hair down to my feet so strange
So I look like a walking mountain range
And I'm gonna ride into Omaha on a horse
Out to the country club and the golf course.
Carry the New York Times, shoot a few holes, blow their minds.

Now you're probably wondering by now
Just what this song is all about
What's probably got you baffled more
Is what this thing here is for.
It's nothing
It's something I learned over in England.



FZ

This post was modified by ghostofpig on 2010-03-31 17:03:05

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 31, 2010 10:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

FZ?

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 11:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

Isn't that quote from Sheik Yerbouti? Frank Zappa?

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 31, 2010 11:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

No, you bozo. It's Dylan. Same place as your 'poet and I know it' quote came from.

By the way, if dissertenacity isn't an actual word then it certainly should be.


And I still want to know what that thing is.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 12:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

It's the meds.

Perhaps it's a capo? Yes, I googled. Some say harmonica holder--but that wasn't new. Others say the chord he plays--but--oh, fine, I fucking give up on the meaning.

Please dissertate.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 31, 2010 4:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

If I could dissertate I'd dissertate all over you.

I actually have no clue what the 'thing' is. I was looking for enlightenment, not trying to catch anyone out. Capo was my thought too, but capos would have been in common use then, wouldn't they? I suspect this is another example of musicianly mischievousness - sending the gullible to grub around for meaning where meaning is there none. But I'm happy to be told I'm wrong.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 5:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

http://www.topix.com/forum/who/bob-dylan/T6E4OEAVEJGO55FKM


Private joke no doubt. Good topic for a disserta

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 12:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

dissertenacity+ a large sandbox in a town park.

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Poster: high flow Date: Mar 31, 2010 12:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

Are you sure it's not a sweet post-meal bite in a town like this?

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Poster: Hal R Date: Mar 30, 2010 7:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

There is Hunter as a writer of lyrics and as a writer of poems. He has had several books of poetry out(I have three books of his poetry). Do I pick them up as often as the Box of Rain book, no. Hardly ever. But he was very influenced by poetry and other literature. A big part of his cultural milieu were the beats, so he carried that as did Dylan into the lyric form. The next phase. I have seen him (Hunter) mention Lew Welch (one of my favorites) and Lew was very influenced by WCW.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 30, 2010 4:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

As a rough and ready distinction would you accept that the writer of a lyric always has to keep in mind the fact that some poor sap is going to have to attempt to sing it, whereas a poet may craft away with no regard to whether the thing can even be read out loud?

And by the way, when did 'dissert' become a verb for fuck's sake?

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Poster: ringolevio Date: Mar 30, 2010 6:38pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

I thought it was a clever pun - not sure if intentional - because I thought immediately of the William Carlos Williams poem about eating cold plums that were meant for breakfast, er, eating them as "dessert" ... so he "disserted" on the guy who wrote a famous "dessert" poem. Haa.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 31, 2010 12:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

You, my friend, are just too clever by half.

:-)

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 6:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

I'm doing the math here--wait--you calling me a half wit?
Some Hunter stuff that rings with the magic of poetry:

Rosemary, China Cat, Black Peter, much of American Beauty, Eyes of the World, Sunshine, China Doll, Crazy Fingers . . . These go beyond simple lyric into something more infinite and etherial.

Dissertitties.

This post was modified by ghostofpig on 2010-03-31 13:46:38

This post was modified by ghostofpig on 2010-03-31 13:47:13

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Mar 31, 2010 7:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

I will grant you that many of the things you mention look good on the printed page, but I absolutely defy you to read them without hearing the music in your head too. Just how much of that ethereal quality comes from the lyrics themselves, and how much from their indissoluble association with they way they were performed? Let me tell ya, brother, you can't have one without the other. Symbiosis, pure and simple.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 8:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

I agree wholeheartedly. Most song lyrics don't smack of the poetic when seen on the page--they are written as song lyrics--and when you hear the music, your are forced into that cadence, presentation, the tone, etc. Of course, it's always wierd to listen to those Caedmon (is that the name?) recordings of Eliot, WCW, Pound, Thomas, et al. reading their stuff out loud. Any poem read out loud changes by virtue of the voice and its sounds and by the interpretation of the reader.

But even if we gave Hunter's stuff to a non-Deadite for a read--someone who likes poetry and reads the stuff--I doubt that much would rise to the surface. I'm really not all that sure that I'd consider many lyricists to be poets. But then again, there are exceptions such as Bobby D.

But that's not to say that lyric writing isn't an art form--or songwriting. Even when art is collaberative, it's art.

Dissertenacity.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 8:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

Let me add this:

I can't for the life of me read the lyrics to Dark Star or Brown Eyed Women without rolling into the tune.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Mar 31, 2010 5:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Robert Hunter

No--I disserted the profession after finishing my doctorate, though I did get my just disserts, I'm sure.

Much early poetry was meant to be sung--e.g. Homer's hand me downs were sung by generations before writing kicked in.

I have seen some of Hunter's poetry--didn't know it was "collected." Here's the rub: if it sucks, is it still poetry? The Romantics (e.g. Shelly) said that poetry must teach and delight. Hunters--IMO--does neither. But his erly lyrics--as noted--some very fine stuff there. Rosemary--nice!